Culinary Camps For High School Students Near Me Everyday Use, Alice Malsenior Walker, and the Influence of Constance Nabwire of Uganda

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Everyday Use, Alice Malsenior Walker, and the Influence of Constance Nabwire of Uganda

Constance R. Nabwire, a social worker and home economist, is best known for her illustrated books on African cooking and recipes and cultural connections. “Nabwire” is a female name that originates from southeastern Uganda and southwestern Kenya and is often associated with someone born at night. “Bwire” is the masculine form.

In the early 1960s, after graduating from her Ugandan high school in Buddo (Budo), Constance Nabwire attended Spelman College in Georgia where she earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology and psychology. His education and care was supported by the African Student Program of American universities. She then moved to the University of Minnesota where she completed her master’s degree in social work.

Fortunately, Constance Nabwire was given the opportunity to host the future Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (1983) and National Book Award (1983) Alice Malsenior Walker at the famous Spelman College of History in Atlanta. They will be best friends, they will be happy and interested in each other, and they will exchange endlessly.

Evelyn C. White writes about their relationship and education. The academically gifted Nabwire noticed, but was not surprised, that Alice was best written by famous Russian novelists. It was also important to Nabwire that Alice was very different from the other students at Spelman. Nabwire explains that Alice was well-versed in foreign affairs, Spelman’s view of foreign affairs, worked hard to be friends with African students, and did not think as much about “Friday night” as other students. Indeed Nabwire felt privileged and enriched to have Alice who inspired him to be positive and worldly (White: 73-74).

Walker and Nabwire were so close that they shared things like clothes, and together they went to places of interest and other things to see for themselves. An incident that showed racism and bigotry in the white church, shocked Nabwire to tears and other emotional disturbances. White shows Walker’s thoughts on the white people attending the church in Eatonton, Georgia, where he was born in 1944, and Nabwire’s reaction when the two were refused entry to the white church in Atlanta. Alice remembered that the white churchgoers in Eatonton were racist. The day Alice, wearing a pink dress (bought by Nabwire), went with Nabwire to church in Atlanta, it would be difficult. Evelyn White would recognize what Nabwire did.

“The Europeans… missionaries had come to Uganda and taught… it was important to worship God… read the Bible… pray.’… ‘When Alice and I tried to enter the church… the door was slammed in our faces. I didn’t understand… for months, I did nothing but cry” (White: 161).

Nabwire and Walker shared a “pink dress,” which Walker called “divine” (White: 76).

Walker, along with his entire organization of women and Nabwire made a loving and heartfelt effort to pay their respects and go to the grave where Walker was found. Nabwire’s influence on Walker was so great, that he went to Uganda. Alice describes Nabwire as, “…a wonderful person…smart and gentle beyond her years and…among many other girls at…school” (Walker 2010). Alice recounted what happened at the cemetery when she spoke at the Organization of African Writers, a conference held at New York University in 2004.

A recently discovered ancestral grave in Georgia was that of Alice’s great-grandmother Sally Montgomery Walker (1861-1900). To pay his respects, Walker returned to the grave with flowers and among those who were with him was Constance “a wonderful woman … who made me care more about Africans and African women” (Goodman 2004). Amy Goodman recorded many of Walker’s words about his trip to Uganda in the mid-1960s: “… I went to Uganda … beautiful … quiet … green “(2004).

Those who accompanied Alice to Sally Walker’s grave included a whole group of women and one Belvee friend, many of whom had a history of pain and suffering. At the grave they cried, and the poet Walker summed it up: “We watered that grave with tears… glad to do” (Goodman 2004).

Because of Nabwire’s fascination, Walker was able to understand the culture and traditions of African people, and read a lot of famous African writers. The articles on his website present his views, practices, and readings of Africa; and comparisons with Black America. These passages are part of Walker’s speech on September 13, 2010 as part of the 11th Annual Steve Biko Lecture at the University of Cape Town. Walker realized that even though racism was very high in the United States in the 1940s and 1950s, he searched with interest to find out what was happening in Africa, considering that “Africans were surrounded by a lot of distortions, because of racism. misconceptions, misuses, and lies” (Walker 2010).

Alice said that Africans were “delighted with delight, looked upon as barbarians.” Also at Spelman College, to strengthen her important friendship with Nabwire whom she loved as a sister, Alice admired the African song, “Nkosi Sikeleli’Afrika” which produced “sounds of humility, love, devotion and trust” (Walker 2010). Beyond people, countries, and culture, Walker’s interest in Africa included nature as he became interested in other things such as forests and animals. through the works of African literary giants like Elechi Amadi, Camara Laye, Ama Ata Aidoo, Buchi Emecheta, Bessie Head, Okot p’ Bitek, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, and Ayi Kwei Armah, Walker opened that she “began to an intellectual and moral reasoning that was limited [and] it is often very deep” (Walker 2010).

On her visit to Uganda in 1964, Alice Walker was surprised by the respect, peace, kindness, greenery, hospitality, and patience.

“Uganda… referred to by Winston Churchill as… the ‘Japan’ of Africa, because of… the respect of the people… the kindness. This… colonialist mentality, but… it was also a country of.. . the greenest hills and valleys … there … a good feeling of peace and patience with the visitor” (Walker 2010).

The names of the Ugandan family where Alice Walker slept have not been released, but they live near the capital, Kampala.

“I was adopted … by a Ugandan family who protected me … took care of me … and removed … any thoughts that … I had that I would not be recognized as one of the children of Africa” ​​(Walker 2010) .

But as Melanie L. Harris explains, although Walker admired Ugandans for their kindness and care, and continued to communicate with Nabwire after he moved to Sarah Lawrence College, “the depth of poverty and the effects of colonialism made Walker’s journey … [to Africa] hard to bear” (Harris 2010: 34).

The popular and controversial academic short story, “Everyday Use,” is part of Walker’s collection of short stories. The collection titled “In Love and Trouble: Stories of Black Women” was first published in 1973. “Everyday Use” refers to the Deep South of the United States, the black family and social change, and Uganda.

In this story, the beautiful Dee who is older than her crippled and shy sister Maggie who is stuck in the southern culture with their mother Mama Johnson goes home after spending too much time in town. The introverted and audacious Dee sees herself as a revolutionary woman now embracing modernism and black radicalism. At the beginning of her visit home with her fat friend Hakim, Dee greets, “Wa.su.zo.Tean.o!” This seems that Walker is changing to write “Wasuz’otya nno/ Wasuze otya nno?” which in Luganda means “How did you sleep?” In Buganda it is a common morning word that is similar to, “How did you sleep,” “How was your night,” or “Hello.” Sometimes the greeting is shortened to “Wasuz’otya/ Wasuze otya?” While in Uganda, Alice Walker must have often encountered morning greetings. Also, the greeting contains a question mark, apart from the obvious information that is included in the short story.

In “Everyday Use,” Dee also announced that he was no longer Dee, and changed his name to Wangero Leewanika Kemanjo. In Luganda, “Wangero” can be a personal or a place name, and it means “the place (or place) of the story.” In Walker’s other words, his friend Constance Nabwire is called Constance Wangero. Is this a spelling mistake or is Nabwire also known as “Wangero?” Also Mount Wangero is in Buganda, so Walker must have visited or known the place or its name and used it in his short story.

The closest African name to “Leewanika,” is Lubosi Lewanika who was the king or great chief of Barotseland in what is now western Zambia. Lewanika ruled from 1878 to 1916, and was tricked in 1890 by Cecil Rhodes into handing over the country to British protection through the British South Africa Company. However, Lewanika would go to London in 1902 where he was embraced and attended the ceremony of King Edward VII. Rhodesia was named after the brutal and infamous colonial Rhodes, and was later renamed Zimbabwe (after “Great Zimbabwe”) just weeks after Robert Mugabi became the country’s first black minister in 1980.

“Kemanjo” may be an African name, or it may be derived from one.

Referenced Works

Goodman, Mother. “Alice Walker on the ‘Toxic Culture’ of Globalization.” Democracy Now! October 2004.

Harris, Melanie L. Gifts of Virtue, Alice Walker, and Womanist Ethics. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

Walker, Alice. “Coming to See You Since I Was Five: The Relation of American Poetry to South African Soul;” 11th Annual Steve Biko Lecture. September 2010: http://alicewalkersgarden.com/

White, Evelyn, C. Alice Walker: A Life. New York: WW Norton & Company, 2004.

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