Culinary Institute Of America Gluten Free Classes Bread Baking 101

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Bread Baking 101

Baking bread doesn’t have to be complicated or difficult, but there are a few tips to ensure the quality of the bread you bake. Sure, it’s easy to go to the grocery store and buy sliced ​​bread. Anyone can do that, of course. Have you ever looked at the ingredient list on the back of the package? It is full of scientific terms that I cannot pronounce. At least I know what goes into my bread: flour, yeast, salt, and sugar. Very important and that’s how I like it.

The best advice I have is this: Practice, practice, practice. My first loaves were hard and well served like baseball bats instead of baguettes. I studied and tried to improve my baking skills. I think I’ve learned more through trial and error than in a cooking class at culinary school. Most of all, pushing the dough with your hand connects you to your food. Although I use a mixer most of the time, some days I give the mixer a break and knead it by hand. It’s not just exercise, you also learn how to make a good dough and appreciate it more.

Powder:

For all solid purposes, the best flour to use is bread flour. It is high in gluten and will produce good results. There is a lot of powder out there. Once you know how to bake bread, you can try other flours. If you want to use wheat to make healthy bread, I recommend replacing half of the bread flour with whole wheat.

Yeast: It’s life!

What is yeast? I have been teaching my son to bake bread and he is always fascinated by yeast. Since I use SAF yeast at the same time, I don’t have to do it in the bud but it’s a fun experiment for an 8-year-old girl. The budding yeast wakes it up and makes it come alive. Adding sugar makes it grow faster because it is an organism that likes to eat (and eat and eat).

However, it can be permanent.

Yeast likes:

  • Sugar
  • Warm water (not too hot or too cold – this will kill)

Yeast hates:

  • Salt – salt is very important in baking because it gives it flavor and helps keep the yeast in check (it slows it down, basically). If the salt is not included in the dough, the yeast will go inside and eat more. It doesn’t know when to stop. The salt comes in and slows down the yeast – like a club shooter.
  • Very hot

For years I used Fleishman’s or Red Star yeast. All of these work well, but I switched to SAF yeast which comes in a large package and is used by professional bakers.

Founders:

I was given the opportunity to start 15 years ago not so long ago. This was probably the best gift I have ever been given. Okay, so it sounds weird, but now I can bake sourdough bread once a week and eat the best sandwiches and toast in the world. It’s all about the bread.

I’m sure you’ve had sourdough. Known for its bread, San Francisco’s sourdough bread tastes different from Chicago’s sourdough bread. Why? It eats the natural yeast in the air and the air in Chicago is different from San Francisco. My first sour has been here in Montana for 15 years. I believe it has a different flavor than the one made in Ohio.

If you want to make your own, here’s a primer:

The founder of Honey

1 package of dry yeast

2 1/2 cups warm water (105º-115ºF)

2 spoons of honey

2 1/2 cups bread or all-purpose flour

Combine the ingredients in a quart jar with a tight fitting lid. Close the jar and let the mixture ferment in a warm place for five days, stirring every day. Store in the refrigerator. Bring the starter with water and flour in equal parts.

Basic Instructions:

It is surrendered and fed. When using the original cup for cooking, you need to make up for it by adding 3/4 cup water and 3/4 cup flour. Let it sit at room temperature for a day before refrigerating. Plan to bake bread about once a week or once every few weeks. Make sure you feed a spoonful of flour and water every day or every other day.

Sponges:

Sponge is a type of starter that is not usually kept around, so it does not have the taste of sourdough. The sponges are left to rise overnight and are used the next day in bread.

Weather:

How does Mother Nature relate to baking bread? A lot, actually. If it is humid and rainy, you need to use more powder. If the weather is dry, then you use less flour. This is why I don’t measure flour when baking. By feeling the dough, I can tell if enough flour has been incorporated. This goes back to advice – practice.

With a little knowledge and a few good recipes, you can make your own bread that will be tastier and healthier than the ones sold in stores.

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