How Do I Get Into Culinary School The Couscous Challenge

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The Couscous Challenge

I love my job. Partly because I love reading the English language and because reading so many recipes and health articles every week fills me with nutritional wisdom – and a desire to learn more.

Of course, being a copy editor doesn’t necessarily make you a good cook either. But with time, patience, and a good appetite, we can all learn.

The first step in the spreading learning process is interest. It was this unfortunate situation that led me to wander down the pasta aisle of our local grocery store one day, sitting among the grains, waiting for divine inspiration to drop me with a wonderful idea for dinner. Then I saw the dreaded crop that ruined my teenage years: couscous.

Growing up in a Mediterranean household comes with a mother who is an excellent cook, who eats a lot of food, and in the name of health, often feeds you the most disgusting concoctions. As fate would have it, couscous, along with fish soup and bean soup – all bad things for young minds, were served every week.

Although I fell in love with the rest, couscous remained elusive. Even so, week after week, as I sat at the table for hours, staring at my bowl of smelly couscous, I really shared the fact that couscous is important. And yes, there’s no way around it, couscous is good for you. This grain contains vitamins, minerals, calcium, and other nutrients, it protects the proper digestion of food and protects against diseases.

So today, when I look at the back of my childhood enemy, I already felt a problem: Shopping, squeeze his food – and find a way to be happy.

Pictures from food shows, pictures from cookbooks, and my college friend Martin’s creations from college came into my head. The great chef, the Saveur, the wild rice – that’s what made me stop. Yes, I remembered that wild rice. It was Wednesday, and Martin found yet another way to change my mind and date her: making magic in the dorm kitchen, skinless chicken breasts and wild rice. The flavor was a little off at the end – and I, frankly, might have left him to do the dishes. But what was now compatible with my situation was the color of that wild rice: white with brown spots. What was the brown one?

Thanks to the Crunchy Breakfast recipe that I prepared last week, suddenly, I remembered the brown ingredient: flaxseed. These Omega-3 fatty acid superstars, with many disease-fighting benefits, can enhance the benefits of couscous AND help the appearance of the dish. So I took the package and left the store – after paying a small amount of money – quickly.

A few hours later, a familiar noise arose from my kitchen. But it smelled different this time. By then I had made more, adding garlic and tomatoes to the pot. And it all took me only 15 minutes. Now without further ado, I will share with you how to do it:

Ingredients

4 cups of water

1/2 cup couscous

1/2 large onion, chopped

2 cloves of garlic, finely chopped

1 whole tomato, chopped

1 tbsp olive oil

salt and pepper to taste

flax seed

Directions

1. Boil water, then add couscous, oil, chopped garlic and spices.

2. Cook for a few minutes, then add onions and tomatoes.

3. After a few minutes, add the flaxseed.

4. Leave to cook for no more than 7 minutes, then take it out and drain the excess water carefully.

The total cooking time was about fifteen minutes. Flaxseed added crunch to the couscous, while the tomatoes provided a sweet, rich flavor — and added a super healthy kick.

However in the end, I was not surprised by the taste of the couscous. As I sat at my kitchen counter, tasting the ingredients again, I felt like I had failed and now I had a terrible three-day-old couscous. Something was missing.

When I gave up, I wrapped the food and went to my room. But it consumed me, and I couldn’t let it go. I went online and wondered what to write. And after aimless, confused passages, I decided to start from the beginning, follow my footsteps, and understand the basics of what I had created.

And slowly, the idea suddenly hit me: I cooked couscous, and even though the pot had other delicious things, the flavors had melted into one mild taste. And then, the answer: all the necessary dishes were kicking. Fresh vegetables, a little spice, and perhaps an additional component of a complete meal. Thanks to that bell pepper I bought on a salad that was mixed with couscous it stole the show this afternoon. And white smoke, how lucky I was that I had another stuffed tomato, another half of an onion, AND – the secret ingredient – spicy jalapeños. And those two chicken legs I saw in the freezer?

You can guess the result, or you can look at the picture. And because they are all good, I will continue to do them, and share them with you here:

Additional information

1 whole tomato

6 (according to taste) jalaenos

1/2 onion

2 chicken legs, cooked, shredded

Just two things to remember: Chop the tomato, jalapeños, and onion so you don’t get too much flavor. Add the chicken legs, and drizzle with olive oil – and a little lemon, to get more shooting points. Right now, you are so far ahead, that even without lemons, you have won. Which, as it turns out, isn’t all about winning or losing, or even terrible mommy recipes.

It’s about understanding the nature of what you’re cooking, and what you want to achieve.

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